Arrow Measuring and Cutting

There is only one way of measuring arrows correctly, as recommended by AMO (Archery Manufacturers Organisation). This is from the nock groove or throat (the hole that sits on the string) to the end of the shaft, without including the insert or the point. Every time you want some arrows built, this is the measurement you should use, time after time.

Of course, to get it right, you have to have a nock installed on your arrow. When that is not possible, some people prefer to give the actual bare shaft length, without the nock and the bushing (the aluminium insert that keeps the nock in place in the shaft). If you ask someone to cut your arrow shafts to length, make it clear which measurement system you want them to use.

After you have measured and marked your arrows to the desired length, you are ready to cut them. Only use specialised equipment, like the Decut Arrow Cutter. This will allow for a nice, clean cut: you want the cut to be straight, with a section plane perfectly perpendicular on the arrow length, without any rough edges. Once arrows are cut, they should be de-burred and any excess dust cleaned from the inside of the arrow to help glue to adhere.

Important: the cut of the shaft is always made from the front of the shaft, the part where the point is. To make sure you are cutting from the right end, sit your arrows with the branding facing you, the right way up. Normally, the nock and vanes should be on the right hand side and the point on the left hand side. That means you should cut from the left hand side.
We can also observe that the side with the point, the one that we are going to cut away, has more empty space that is unmarked by any decals or writing - this is let on purpose so that your arrows will look nice after cutting.

If in doubt - as you don't want to cut a set of expensive arrows from the wrong end - always compare your new shafts with your old ones or with pictures on the internet. Remember: it's better to measure 3 times and cut once.

 

Read previous: Arrow Spine Selection

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